Good Practice examples

Featured examples

Wellbeing Diary

The Hub with university a partner developed an online self-reflective wellbeing diary. The diary is used by individuals to monitor their wellbeing where with multiple entries, users can compare and see there changes in wellbeing with graphs. The diary uses a holistic approach to wellbeing which encompasses 23 different wellbeing factors including compassion, sleep, burnout, self-harm, drug & alcohol use as well as more clinical mental health symptoms such as dissociation, avoidance and flashbacks. High level real-time data is used by the Hub to identify trends and percentage of staff struggling with different areas of wellbeing which the Hub can respond to, e.g. data showed that staff were struggling with sleep therefore the Hub responded by developing and providing CBT insomnia group sessions for individuals

Compassion for Self | Process

Hug in a mug

We are a small team of around 15 but we cover multiple clinical sites and don't often get together. We meet via MS Teams every morning for the Safety Huddle but there will be some weeks where you may not see some team members. We try to recognise and acknowledge moments of note during the huddle and on the group chat but we have also introduced the Hug in a Mug whereby team members take it in turns to fill the team mug with treats (usually individual to the person) and pass it on with a small note of thanks or acknowledgment for something they have done well or that we have appreciated. Or just to tell them we're thinking of them.

Compassion from Others | Interpersonal

All examples

Yoga

I engage in yoga as an activity that supports my own wellbeing . It makes me feel physically stronger as feel more toned and have greater muscle strength , which in turn supports my immune system. It also provides me with energy and a vitality each morning to support me being able to get on with my day ahead . Yoga also helps with my stress levels , reduces fatigue and can reduce my emotional reactivity to things . The joining together and focus on my breath and physical exercise, I find helps calm my mind at times when my brain can feel busy and full and it can help centre my attention onto the hear and now

Compassion for Self | Process

The power of movement

Through personal experience, I have a strong understanding of the huge benefits that physical activity has for mental wellbeing. Being able to run or walk in open spaces, particularly wild spaces, allows us to free our minds and bodies, to feel connected to the earth and to feel powerful and in control. I have many friends and acquaintances who work in caring roles who are equally passionate about running and are as vocal as I am about the way it allows them to turn their back on the stress of work. Running keeps them well and helps them find balance to the pressure of their professional roles. I would like to see workplaces supporting and encouraging opportunities for staff to access the outdoors for movement, no matter what that would be. Sometimes all people need is permission to breathe to begin to thrive.

Compassion for Self | All Themes

Wellbeing Diary

The Hub with university a partner developed an online self-reflective wellbeing diary. The diary is used by individuals to monitor their wellbeing where with multiple entries, users can compare and see there changes in wellbeing with graphs. The diary uses a holistic approach to wellbeing which encompasses 23 different wellbeing factors including compassion, sleep, burnout, self-harm, drug & alcohol use as well as more clinical mental health symptoms such as dissociation, avoidance and flashbacks. High level real-time data is used by the Hub to identify trends and percentage of staff struggling with different areas of wellbeing which the Hub can respond to, e.g. data showed that staff were struggling with sleep therefore the Hub responded by developing and providing CBT insomnia group sessions for individuals

Compassion for Self | Process

Mutual Support at Lunch

When working within a busy community mental health team where staff morale was low and rate of burnout was high the team members came together to provide mutual support. We identified key themes/areas for change, one example being staff members working through their lunch or eating at their desk. Together we agreed that it would be helpful to have mutual support to point out to each other when we might be doing this and neglecting our wellbeing. We would identify either ourselves or colleagues doing this and make a conscious effort to log out/turn off emails so we could have a true break. We would arrange wellbeing walks during our lunch breaks so we could get some fresh air, have a change of environment and physically be away from the temptation to answer emails etc. At least one day a week we would all eat together as a team in a larger room away from laptops and phones. This helped us to feel a sense of togetherness and helped us to prioritise our wellbeing.

Compassion from Others | Interpersonal

Wellbeing challenges for an organisation

When working for a large organisation, it can be hard to find good ways of communicating with staff. An organisation that I worked in had a staff Facebook page that had half of it's staff on it. We set up a challenge which be could accessed via Facebook or to an e-mail address if staff weren't on Facebook. This challenge got people to try out a wellbeing app that is free to NHS staff called, 'Headspace.' For each of the 7 days, we posted information about different parts of the app knowing that 'one size doesn't fit all.' We asked staff to enter the challenge by posting what they had done each day and their experience of using different parts of the app. This meant that it kept the post 'high' on the feed, so that other staff would see it even if they weren't taking part in the challenge. There was a lot of positive feedback on the app from the challenge with the majority of people saying that they would continue to use the app after the challenge (which was the hope).

Compassion for Self | Structure

Support From Supervisor

Having a good relationship with my supervisor and regular in depth clinical supervision. Having an approachable, friendly, non-judgemental supervisor makes me feel like I can raise any issues I have very easily. Regular clinical supervision with my supervisor takes away the need to seek out contact, when sometimes this can be difficult. I also learn a great deal professionally/academically during these sessions. This takes a huge weight off my shoulders and helps to deal particularly with issues such as imposter syndrome.

Compassion from Others | Interpersonal

A mindfulness-based intervention for Long-Covid

A group intervention for staff colleagues with Long-Covid was designed and delivered. Factors that made this intervention possible: - Resource of therapist time, - training in relevant approaches which supported an intervention that was trauma-informed, compassion-focussed and mindfulness-based and informed by a cognitive -behavioural model for long-term conditions - Support by Hub -Support by Line Managers of colleagues to self-refer and to attend The peer support offered in the group supports colleagues who are often feeling isolated and alone. The interventions offered within the group support a change in relationship with symptoms and experiences associated with Long-Covid to one of mindfulness and self-compassion which reduces stress and anxiety, supports engaging in pacing and promotes a successful paced return to work.

Compassion for Others | All Themes

Team check-in

I use a traffic light system to monitor team wellbeing at business meetings and then follow up anyone who reported anything other than 'green' for wellbeing. This enables me to support the team in a timely way and access additional support for them when needed. Examples of this have been making referrals to Occupational Health or other staff support services. On most occasions the follow up contact involves an informal conversation that gives team members an opportunity to be heard and express any issues.

Compassion for Others | Process

Recoco Wellbeing Respite

Recoco have delivered a staff wellbeing respite day to over 250 NHS staff since the beginning of the first Pandemic lockdown. We initially delivering to the staff suffering stress and uncertainty though additional responsibilities and unfamiliarity associated with being made to work on Covid wards. subsequently we have delivered to NHS staff working across both general and mental health fields. The majority of whom work for CNTW. This 7 hr respite helps staff understand the long and short term emotional, and physical impact of continued stress. Connecting mind and body through the breath, individual stress responses are recognised and normalised. Peer support is utilised through shared experiences and understanding, validating and recognising the extraordinary work and home pressures that folk are living under. A 'pick and mix' approach of 9 different wellbeing skills are taught, concentrating on VNS. Including breathing, meditation/PMR, drumming, chanting, dancing and Wim Hoff.

All Compassions | All Themes

Cultivating team connection online

During Covid we had several new team members, were always online, so didn't have the opportunity for the 'kitchen conversations' that help people get to know one another and develop connection. As a team we hold high levels of risk and uncertainty in our clinical work and so the ability to work and thinks as a team, hold and support one another to collectively make difficult decisions is crucial. To foster this we scheduled a weekly lunch time 'teams chat question'. This varied enormously in content ranging from current Netflix viewing, to most iconic record in your collection, to best beach for dog walking, so that it was inclusive to all interests. By using the chat function on teams people could chose to engage, just as you would in real life and also when in the day. The knowledge developed between people helped provide new staff with a sense of belonging, cultivated connection and gave some wonderful moments of light relief and humour

Compassion from Others | Process

Subtle Communication

I live with Bipolar Type 2. When I started work I opened up to my line manager about it. It was hard to do, but helped that they were honest about not knowing much about bipolar, and they were willing to listen and to learn about my experience of living with it. This helped to create trust, which is important for me as I fear the stigma and discrimination that comes when living with a mental health condition. We have a code 'phrase' that I can use in front of the rest of the staff team. No one else would have any idea that it meant anything. For me it's a way of alerting my manager that I'm finding things tough. They can then help prioritise my work load, and action strategies from my stress risk assessments. E.g. Go to quiet areas for non clinical work when possible. It also means that I don't have to go into detail about what is happening as this makes things worse for me. We can focus on making adjustments so that I can stay in work and feel I am still contributing to the team.

All Compassions | All Themes

Hug in a mug

We are a small team of around 15 but we cover multiple clinical sites and don't often get together. We meet via MS Teams every morning for the Safety Huddle but there will be some weeks where you may not see some team members. We try to recognise and acknowledge moments of note during the huddle and on the group chat but we have also introduced the Hug in a Mug whereby team members take it in turns to fill the team mug with treats (usually individual to the person) and pass it on with a small note of thanks or acknowledgment for something they have done well or that we have appreciated. Or just to tell them we're thinking of them.

Compassion from Others | Interpersonal